Mar 11, 2013

(覚書)知っている単語やフレーズの数と流暢さは関係ないと思うよ

In an English learners' gathering yesterday, I came to realize that there are some common doings or believes among learners that might keep them from becoming a fluent user of English.

As the internet letting people all over the world be connected so easily, many Japanese business persons or students mingle with people around the word in many occasions nowadays, and I think they are no longer obsessed with the idea of perfectionism when they use English. They know grammatical correctness is not the biggest factor for a good communication. You'll have a much smoother conversation when you don't worry too much about being correct than trying to sound good with correct grammar and some big words.

Also they know well that it's totally okay to have their own accents as long as they don't become a big obstacle for a communication. For a good, peaceful communication, other factors play a much bigger role, like being friendly and compassionate, rather than being correct or using formal beautiful language.

However, there seem to be some deeply rooted believes and they're very hard to get rid of no matter how many times I explain the uselessness. One is collecting expressions in your notebook every time they come across a new expression that they think might come in handy *some* day. The other is a dictionary. They can't do just one moment without a dictionary....

Many seem to believe with nil doubt that as they memorize more words and phrases, then they'll naturally be a better user. They can't speak English fluently or as much as they can be satisfied and that's mostly because they don't have enough vocabularies or expressions that are necessary for various topics....

Well, I don't know yet how I can talk them into realizing what they believe or some of common believes about learning English is totally wrong and that could be the very reason for them remaining a not so much versatile user. Got to think over that.        

2 comments:

Whiskers said...

The problem is, if English learners listen to an English speech and couldn't understand it very well they automatically blame their lack of vocabulary. And if they couldn't express themselves in English as much as they expected, again they would do the same. In addition, many people find speeches full of big words sophisticated.

In Japan, English language has been treated as a puzzle for a too long time. This created a notion that the more difficult the puzzle is, the smarter the person who solved is proved to be. And if you could use those big words and complicated structure when you speak or write in English, it's a proof of how smart you are.

I guess people cannot believe your words until they really experience it. And who would try it? Probably only those who are truly free from prejudices like you, or who gave up memorizing words and phrases and are desperate to find a new way...

Mrs.Malone_emmie said...

Lately I've been reading some news about how top universities in Japan are trying to change their English lessons. I don't think they're properly heading for the way that let students to be a good user, because they've not realize, or don't want to acknowledge, the importance of easy English, and students have to tackle materials filled with difficult, big words even in the first year. But anyway, the time has come and the change has to be made no matter how long it takes to erase all the useless doings to be be a user.