Jul 5, 2011

Tadoku fascinating, but not magic

I was thinking that tadoku will be a good approach for not only Japanese who learn English but all the language learners, so I've been using the word tadoku instead of extensive reading from the beginning of the blog. And finally, tadoku is started to be acknowledged widely by many language learners and it seems the number of tadoku doers is steadily growing. That's great news, indeed.

On the other hand, there are some people or organizations, who are forever looking for different and new approaches of learning languages, not for their own pleasure of learning but for as an easy way to earn money, and I'm afraid those might end up clouding the personality of tadoku. They advocate as if there is this wonderful approach tadoku and once you follow their advice blindly, your success is sure in your hands, or...

I got a news about a big conference of extensive reading and ran into this LOL expression.
Look at the caption, isn't it absurd?
Extensive reading world conference
Magic carpets fly only in fantasy lands. Aren't we living in the real world?

I'd say tadoku is magical sometimes, but won't carry you into a land of satisfaction with an comfy ride in a magic carpet...

6 comments:

Liana said...

It's felt almost magical for me! But I know what you mean ^^ I read a mailing list about using tadoku in the classroom, and you're right - it's odd to see tadoku described in such simple terms when even teachers who have been trying to use tadoku for years can't agree on how best to implement it! Kind of a cute logo, though.

Mrs. Malone said...

Yes, tadoku is sure magical! or I won't be this assertive to introduce it to many people. But I'm sick of those greedy people who emphasize the effectiveness of tadoku excessively and try to sell books or those who implement tadoku in their classes, even though they're not tadokists themselves...
(This is the reason I got out of the mailing list of Japanese tadoku teachers.)
Some say you'll be able to read PB once you've read three million words. But the truth is, there are many complaining that they are not comfortable enough to read PB even after having read 10 million words.
I didn't realize the logo^^ I like it too!

Clarissa at Talk to the Clouds said...

Aw, don't be too hard on them :/ It's traditional for teaching conferences to have some sort of poetic theme in the subtitle like that. They're often a bit cheesy or kitschy--CATESOL 2011: The Art and Passion of Language Teaching, TESOL 2009: Uncharted Mountains, Forging New Pathways, etc. I expect this theme is meant to suggest the power of books to carry readers away ... haha. :)

Mrs. Malone said...

Hi Clarissa,
Oh, let me off this time, please...(I hope this expression conveys right what I feel.)
After seeing excessively claimed effect of tadoku in Japan, such as you'll be able to read PB once you've read three million English words, and getting to know those Japanese teachers who encourage students to do tadoku when they barely do, I tend to be harsh toward everything concerning tadoku. I think teachers should always remind that tadoku is wonderful but it can be stressful and demanding for some students.
BTW, I was strongly temped to write something bitter again about English education in Japanese when I checked @funfuh... Look at that huge number of followers! What can I say, pathetic?

sloppie said...

Hi,I know what Clarissa is talking about. Well, some teachers and group of teachers like poetic(?)expressions.
Do you want to know what I've found from 「英語教育」magazine bulettin board?
「ゆかいな仲間たち長野大集合~もれなく元気の素(みんな仲良し)進呈!」「○○○ワールドにようこそ」(○○○は講師の名前!)
ha,ha,ha!

Mrs. Malone said...

sloppie-san...
What do you want me to say for such such... a hopelessly hopeless message^^;;;;;;
Minna Nakayoshi is one of the phrases I rather wanna do without.