Jun 10, 2008

study, studies, studied, studying

I was asked
how I explain the inflection of the verb 'study' from one of the professionals of English in Tadoku group.

present form : study
present form : studies
past tense : studied
ing form : studying

What!
I knew these inflections and am using them correctly, maybe.
BUT! I've not realized that the letter 'y' is deleted to make present form for the third person, and it's not deleted to make -ing form.

I work 15 days a year as a teacher, but I felt like I'm cheating my students.
I'd better stick to being an adviser to my students and not to teach anything about English.
The more you study English, the more you realize you know nothing about it.
I have a looong way to go, and I'm thrilled to be able to go such a way with many
wonderful people gathering around Kodomo-shiki and Mr. Sakai.

6 comments:

Chicosunny_e said...

emmie-san! Welcome to the world of complex!!!
You can't go back now. You are too deeply involved to get out. So, am I. It is like an adventure, quite risky one, into a jungle. You never know what happens or what you get. But sometimes you get more, much more than you expected and one day you realized that you can't live without such a ride. But I almost died because of all the stress, responsibilities and never-ending preparation for my classes when I started cheating, I mean teaching, more than a decade ago. I still remember the fear, the terror to stand in front of bunch of brats, I mean kids. I've tried to quit this job numerous times but somehow it haunted me or vice versa.
Anyhow, you don't have to wear colorful costume to be a cheerleader, but you might have to practice to kick up! I'm getting really good at it! ha ha ha...

mrs. malone said...

Hi Chico, you made me lol ^^/~~ I went to high school today and joined the Tadoku class. This is a wonderful thing that some public schools have decided to venture this right but unacceptable approach, but to tell the truth, I have a big doubt about starting Tadoku at schools so soon. Do parents accept Tadoku if none of your students show any conspicuous progress? etc...

Chicosunny_e said...

Dear dear emmie
I know what you mean. I also wonder if it is possible to do TADAKU which is often referred to as Extensive Reading program at schools. I know some of private schools started adopting ER but as you know those are way different from what we call TADAKU. What they do is to read huge amount of books that the teacher recommended. What 's the difference between this types of ER and traditional style of grammar-based English classes? Both of them are totally teacher-centered. Students are passive. And I don't call it true education nor Tadoku. No matter what others call it. I don't! Because I only believe in autonomous learning is the true education for the learner. I take other things as like games, academic games. For instance, entrance exams and all kinds of tests are nothing but games.
With heaps of strenuous practice and a bit of luck,
you win or lose sometimes. But the result can't determine your way of living!! It is solely up to you
what kind of path you would like to take for this life time. My policy is if you play, play it well. I mean just have as much fun as possible whatever you do.
Sometimes we've got to deal with BS and this world if full of BS. But I won't let anything or anybody control my own heart. As long as I keep my soul unchained(remember?), I'll be OK.
Back to the original subject, Tadoku at school. I can't imagine students feel free to enjoy reading like the way we do in a class where they are sure that they would be graded later on. But it might be OK to start from ER and ended up in Tadoku somehow. After all, all we can do is to introduce Tadoku in the best way we can. Wether one is gonna start Tadoku or not is up to the one. I can't see how Tadoku becomes the main stream of English Education but only hope is this universal law "The world is unpredictable."
Oh, well. In the mean time, I'll try to play the game well at the university. It has been quite tricky but I try not to be lost. Wish me luck! I really need that because I've just failed to pass the papers on phonetics. I've been thinking how I can write butt-kicking papers.
Chico

mrs. malone said...

Hi chico! How could YOU fail such assignment. ??? I just don't get it. I joined the Tadoku class yesterday. Students are relaxed and teachers don't push them to read, so that's OK. But, well, how can I say, setting books in the classroom and reading aloud cannot change unmotivated and unwilling high school students. When you do Tadoku at home, there is nothing you have to follow. If you want to read, then you read. If you don't, then you don't. That's all. It doesn't matter how long it takes children to start reading, we just wait the very moment children show some interests. But there are at least several rules students have to follow. They have to stay in the class in certain time even when they don't feel like reading. You have to listen to the teacher reading a story even the story is not one of your taste, etc. If you really want to do Tadoku at schools, I think you need to well prepare for it and have some tricks to motivate students to do something in the class. It's really hard to explain in English. I give up here...

Chicosunny_e said...

hi,emmie-san. I think I understood what you meant.
I could be wrong though. Perhaps you're concerned about the artificial setting the students have to deal with at school. It is true that even they don't feel like reading or listening to the stories at all, they must show up the class. This invisible chain might deprive all the pleasure and benefit of Tadoku. Plus tests and grading would be quite powerful obstacles, I guess.
In order to get over those obstacles, really powerful alternative way to motivate students to take Tadoku classes should be introduced like you said. It is really true that learners got to be motivated first. Otherwise, only a few of them get benefit from it.
Tadoku is supposed to be versatile but it requires certain amount of time and certain atmosphere to allow learners to cultivate their own ways.
Am I off the point? I admit that my way of thinking can be soooo off the point. That's why some of my papers didn't pass. Gee...

mrs. malone said...

Hi chico! yes, you got my point! I had several questions after visiting high school the other day. 1)Is it good to start Tadoku lesson when you have small amount of very easy books? 2)Do high school students enjoy ORT from the bottom of their heart? 3)Can you stay calm if no students show interests? 4)Did teachers read or listen to the books and CDs? 5)We shouldn't push students to read, but is it OK to let students do what they want, sleeping, chattering, working on other subjects, and finish the class without giving them any sense of fulfillment. やる気のない生徒(かつての私)を教室に縛り付けておかなければならないことが耐えられないんです。なので、わずかでも充実感を感じて授業終了になるよう、ない頭を絞るんですが、そういう準備時間が学校の先生にあるのかなあ~。